Glosario documentos

BLOQUE DEL LIBRO

Tipo de construcción de documentos en forma de conjunto de hojas o secciones plegadas que se encuadernan sin portada. Elementos del bloque de libro: las páginas interiores, encartes, guardas. El bloque de libro de los pasaportes/documentos de viaje suele ser formado por la inserción de hojas plegadas entre sí. Para encuadernar los bloques de libro se utiliza un hilo, una grapa metálica o un hilo térmico. Un bloque de libro tiene un borde superior, un borde inferior y un borde lateral. Tras el corte, las esquinas de un bloque de libro pueden ser rectas o redondeadas.

Fig. 1. Formación de un bloque de libro insertando pliegos unidos unos a otros


Fig. 2. Kuwait. El pasaporte especial expedido en 2017:
a — el borde lateral, el borde superior, el borde inferior del bloque del libro; b — lo mismo. El borde superior; c — lo mismo. El borde inferior. Los elementos del bloque del libro: guarda, páginas interiores insertadas una dentro de la otra y cosidas para formar el lomo


CÓDIGO DE BARRAS

La información gráfica en forma de un conjunto de líneas paralelas de distinta anchura y (o) figuras geométricas rectangulares. Esta medida de seguridad puede ser verificada con dispositivos especiales. El código de barras puede tener medidas de seguridad (la luminiscencia UV, la tinta magnética, etc.).

Según el método de codificación, se distinguen los siguientes tipos de códigos de barras:

  • el código de barras lineal se codifica y se lee en una dirección;
  • el código de barras bidimensional se codifica y se lee en dirección horizontal y en dirección vertical.

Fig. 1. Brunéi. El pasaporte expedido en 2008:
a — la página 1. El sustrato de papel; b — lo mismo. El código de barras lineal. La impresión tipográfica; c — lo mismo. El código de barras lineal. El reverso de la impresión. La luz oblicua


Fig. 2. Azerbaiyán. El pasaporte expedido en 2007:
a — la página 4. El sustrato de papel; b — lo mismo. El código de barras bidimensional. Un fragmento en Zoom. La impresión por láser


DATA PAGE

A page of a passport or a travel document on which the issuing authority applies holder’s personal data and data concerning issue and validity. The main holder’s portrait is located on the data page.

The data page of a machine-readable travel document contains a visual inspection zone and a machine-readable zone. The data page may be located on an inner page, an insert or an endpaper.


DATA PAGE INTEGRATION INTO A BOOK BLOCK

A data page is a multilayer polycarbonate construction which is thread-sewn into a book block.

Types of integration:

  • data page is sewn along the inner (binding) edge without using fasteners;
  • data page is sewn using a band;
  • data page is sewn using a band and an additional binding band.

The sewn-in band is made of polymer materials with high flexural strength. One side of the band is bound to the data page, the other side remains loose in the form of a fold. The binding band is laid over the sewn-in band in the place of connection to the data page. Both sewn-in and binding bands may have additional security features, e.g. embossing, UV-luminescent inks, etc.

a

b

c

d

e

f

g

h

Types of data page integration into a document blank:
a — data page is sewn along the inner (binding) edge without using fasteners. Scheme; b — data page is sewn using a band. Scheme; c — data page is sewn using a band and an additional binding band. Scheme; d — Norway. Passport. One of data page inner layers is sewn in along the binding edge; e — Bosnia and Herzegovina. Passport. Data page is sewn using a band; e — Interpol. Passport. Data page is sewn using a band and an additional binding band; f — the same image. Security elements of the sewn-in band: embossing in the form of repeated characters «XO»; g — Sweden. Temporary passport. Security elements of the sewn-in band: UV-luminescent pink ink. View in UV light of 365 nm

DEMETALLIZATION

The process when text or design elements are removed from the metallic layer by a laser or chemical erasure and become visible when viewing in transmitted light.

Fig. 1. Great Britain. Passport issued in 2015:
a — data page. Paper substrate; b — the same. Number made by foil demetallization. Transmitted light; c — the same. Zoomed fragment


Fig. 2. Russian Federation. Passport issued in 2010:
a — data page. Polymer substrate. The Blik security element is marked with a frame; b — the same. View at a right angle of observation and illumination to the document surface. The image on the background is printed in red ink (offset). It is visible through demetallized areas; c — the same. View at an angle of 45°. Holder's portrait; d — the same. Zoomed fragment. The anti-copy pattern and the image are visible through the demetallized areas


DID® DIFFRACTIVE IDENTIFICATION ELEMENT

A diffractive optically variable image (developed by SURYS, France) which contains elements that change their color when rotating the image by 90° (the angle of observation is not changed). DID® is transparent at a right angle of observation that makes it easy to read personal data.

Fig. 1. France. Passport issued in 2013:
a — data page. Paper substrate; b — the same. DID®. View at an angle of 45º in oblique light; c — the same. A color change observed while rotating the image by 90° without changing the angle of observation and illumination. Blue elements become green and vice versa


Fig. 2. Slovakia. Passport issued in 2014:
a — data page. Polymer substrate; b — the same. DID®. View at an angle of 45º in oblique light; c — the same. A color change observed while rotating the image by 90° without changing the angle of observation and illumination. Green elements become orange and vice versa


DOCUMENT / BLANK NUMBER

A unique combination of numbers and (or) letters which is given to every document. It may be applied by letterpress, laser engraving, perforation or printed by a printer. An ink which is used for printing numbers may luminesce in UV and (or) IR light and have magnetic properties. Special fonts and numbering devices are used for applying blank numbers.

Fig. 1. New Zealand. Travel document (Convention of 28 July 1951) issued in 2016:
a — page spread (pages 2-3). Polymer (data page) and paper substrate (page 3); b — the same. Data page. Document number. Relief laser engraving; c — the same. Zoomed fragment. Foaming and blackening (carbonization) of the substrate surface caused by the laser beam; d — the same. Page 3. Blank number. Letterpress; e — the same. Magnetic ink. Image captured by the magnetooptical scanner Regula 7701M; f — the same. Page 3. Blank number. Laser perforation; g — the same. Zoomed fragment. Perforated holes are flat. The edges of the holes and the adjacent areas of the substrate have traces of burning left by the laser beam


DOCUMENT CONSTRUCTION

A form, a material and a structural design of a document. There are following types of a document according to these characteristics: a passport book, a sheet document, a booklet, a card.

DOCUMENT PERSONALIZATION

The process whereby a variable data incorporated into a document. The data allows identifying the document and its holder and verifying whether the document belongs to the holder. According to the way of personalization the data can be read and proceeded both manually and automatically with the help of special scanners, card-readers, etc.

The personal data is applied by laser perforation, laser engraving, or with the help of a printer.

DOCUMENTO DE UNA SOLA HOJA

Un documento en forma de una sola hoja de papel sin pliegues. Puede ser utilizado como documento separado o como etiqueta en la página de un documento.

Fig. 1. Suecia. El pasaporte provisional (de urgencia) expedido en 2011:
a — el averso. El sustrato de papel. El tamaño es 210×297mm. Se utiliza como un documento separado; b — lo mismo. El reverso; c — lo mismo. El averso en luz ultravioleta


Fig. 2. Estonia. El permiso de residencia:
a — la etiqueta. El averso. El sustrato de papel de una base autoadhesiva. El tamaño es 70×91mm. Aplicado en una página de documento; b — lo mismo en luz ultravioleta


DOCUMENTO DE VIAJE

Un documento oficial expedido por un estado o una organización internacional usado por su portador para viajar a diferentes países y que contiene datos obligatorios de inspección visual.

Documento de viaje de lectura a máquina también contiene breves datos obligatorios en una forma que puede ser leída y autenticada por máquinas.

Tipos de documentos:

DOT MATRIX (NEEDLE) PRINTING

The print is formed by a print head which consists of a set of pins driven forward by the power of electromagnets. The print head moves line by line along the sheet, with the pins hitting the paper through the ink-soaked ribbon to form a dot matrix image. Dot matrix (needle) printers are used for printing monochrome texts.

Characteristic features of the print:

  • dotted structure of text symbols is noticeable;
  • slight indentation of each dot into the paper.

Fig. 1. Russian Federation. Passport issued in 2010:
a — page spread (pages 2-3). Paper substrate; b — the same. Personalization data. Dot matrix printer; c — the same. Zoomed fragment. Dotted structure of the print. Uneven, blurry contours of the stroke; d — the same. Personalization data. The ink layer left by the ink ribbon of the printer covers the substrate unevenly


ELECTRONIC DOCUMENT (E-PASSPORT)

A document in the form of a book or a card with an electronic chip and an antenna. A microchip contains scrambled holder’s personal data: digital photo, name, data from a machine-readable zone, fingerprints and iris, etc. This data is read by special devices and compared to document personalization data, holder’s physical data and the database. Documents with bio data usually have special mark (fig. 1).

Fig. 1. Azerbaijan. Passport.
Mark which determine the presence of a microchip in the passport.

ENDPAPER

An element of a document construction in the form of a paper sheet which binds a book block to the inner side of the cover. Endpapers are usually manufactured from special security paper which differs from the paper of inner pages. Some documents may not have endpaper made of paper.

Types of endpapers in passports and travel documents:

  • front endpaper (inner side of the cover that precedes the title page);
  • back endpaper (inner side of the cover at the end of the document).


ESTAMPADO EN GOFRADO

Una imagen incolora en gofrado aplicada al sustrato mediante la deformación del material bajo presión. En el sustrato de papel la imagen se produce por presión, mientras en el sustrato de polímero se obtiene por presión combinada con calentamiento (gofrado). Se visualiza con luz oblicua y/o deslizante, tiene un efecto táctil. Este gofrado puede ser convexo o cóncavo.

Fig. 1. Madagascar. El pasaporte expedido en 2014:
a — el reverso de la portada. El gofrado (texto y contornos del país); b — lo mismo. Un fragmento en Zoom con luz oblicua


Fig. 2. Nueva Zelanda. El certificado de identidad expedido en 2016:
a — la página de datos. El sustrato de polímero. El gofrado (marcado con flechas); b — lo mismo. Un fragmento en Zoom. La Imagen de un pájaro con los contornos formados por medio de microimpresión. La luz deslizante


Fig. 3. Australia. El pasaporte de emergencia expedido en 2009:
a — el soporte de papel. El sustrato de papel; b — lo mismo. El gofrado en luz oblicua


EYELETS / RIVETS

A fixing method which is applied for connection of flat details, for example, a holder’s portrait and a passport page by using a tube section with the flared head (fig. 1).

a

b

c

Fig. 1. Netherlands. Travel document. Convention of 1951:
а — data page with a holder’s portrait fixed by using rivets;
b, c — rivet: frond and back view

FIBRILLAS DE SEGURIDAD

Las fibrillas sintéticas finas que se añaden a la pasta de papel durante el proceso de su fabricación. Las fibrillas de seguridad pueden estar en toda la hoja del documento o en algún área determinada. Pueden tener propiedades luminiscentes bajo la luz ultravioleta e infrarroja.

Por visibilidad a simple vista son:

  • visibles / coloreadas;
  • invisibles / descoloridas.

Por color son:

  • monocromo;
  • bicolor o multicolor con fragmentos alternos de varios colores.

Por forma son:

  • fibrillas de seguridad similares a hilos sencillos con una sección transversal constante;
  • fibrillas de seguridad complejas con una sección transversal variable (por ejemplo, fibrillas de seguridad ZONA creadas por GOZNAK, Rusia).

Fig. 1. Azerbaiyán. El pasaporte expedido en 1998. Las fibrillas monocromáticas sencillas visibles


Fig. 2. Gran Bretaña. El pasaporte expedido en 2010:
a — las fibrillas sencillas invisibles (descoloridas); b — lo mismo. La luz ultravioleta; c — las fibrillas sencillas bicolor en luz blanca; d — lo mismo. La luz ultravioleta; e — las fibrillas de seguridad concentradas cerca del hilo de cosido en la página 3


Fig. 3. Rusia. El pasaporte expedido en 2010:
a — las fibrillas de seguridad ZONA bicolor con una sección transversal variable; b — lo mismo. La luz ultravioleta


Fig. 4. Kosovo. El pasaporte diplomático expedido en 2011. La página 17. Las fibrillas de seguridad sencillas descoloridas que se ponen luminiscentes bajo la luz infrarroja


FILTRO DE VERIFICACIÓN

La parte transparente de un documento de varias hojas que permite visualizar imágenes, textos o códigos latentes situados en una página adyacente del documento. Durante el proceso de verificación, el filtro es colocado justo sobre el área de la imagen para que los datos codificados se vuelvan claros y visibles.

El filtro de verificación puede ser una ventana transparente en una de las páginas del documento o puede ser una hoja de policarbonato transparente cosido en una libreta de pasaporte (fig. 1).

a

b

c

Fig. 1. Bélgica. El pasaporte:
а — la página de datos e inserto con un filtro de verificación; b — el filtro de verificación colocado sobre la imagen del titular; c — la imagen codificada latente (datos personales) visualizada con el filtro

FINGERPRINT

A visible graphic reproduction of a holder’s fingerprint uppermost layer (fig. 1). It is a relief lines (papillary pictures). Their structure is determined by a number of friction ridges divided by grooves. These friction ridges form a complex skin pattern which has the following characteristics:

  • individuality — a structure of papillary ridges is individual by its location, configuration and mutual arrangement. They form a special pattern which is unique for every person;
  • relative stability — permanent structure of the uppermost skin layer which remains unchanged throughout the life;
  • ability to recover — After the skin damage papillary ridges recover to the initial state.

Fingerprint identification is the most common, effective and reliable biometric technology.

a

b

c

Fig. 1. Kosovo. Passport:
а — spread (data page and page 3); b — fingerprint image; c — the same zoomed fragment. Inject printing

FLOATING IMAGE

Optically variable element visually perceived as an image hovering or floating in space above or below the document surface.

Characteristic features of the floating image:

  • the effect of floating in space emerges when the image is viewed at a right angle and disappears when viewed at an acute angle;
  • the kinetic effect is perceived as a slight movement of the image together with the observer when the viewpoint is changed.

The effect of floating images is achieved due to multilayer cell-structured laminate which consists of an array of spherical diverging and converging microlenses. According to the laws of geometrical optics, microlenses produce false images which are perceived by the human eye as floating above or below the document surface.

Retroreflective effect characterized by bright luminescence and color changing is observed when color images are viewed in coaxial light.

The effect of floating images. Scheme

a

b

c

Australia. Emergency passport (2014):
a — uneven laminate structure; b — floating images in the form of black-and-white animal figures. View at a right angle; c — the same image viewed when tilted. The figures move in respect to the text lines

d

e

f

Australia. Diplomatic passport (2014):
d — regular laminate structure (3M™ Color Floating Image Security Laminate); e — floating images in the form of red and blue animal figures. View at a right angle; f — the same image viewed when tilted. The figures move in respect to the text lines

g

h

Australia. Diplomatic passport (2014):
g — retroreflective effect. View at a right angle in coaxial light; h — the same image. Zoomed fragment — bright luminescence of the animal figures

FOLDED DOCUMENT

A type of document construction in the form of a sheet folded once or several times.

Fig. 1. Italy. Identity card issued in 1994:
a — front side. Page spread. Paper substrate. The arrow shows the fold line; b — back side. Page spread


Fig. 2. Germany. Travel permit in lieu of passport issued in 1996:
a — folded document. Front side. Paper substrate; b — page spread. The arrows show the fold lines


Fig. 3. Austria. Vehicle registration certificate issued in 1999. Page spread. Paper substrate


FOTOGRAFÍA SECUNDARIA

La imagen repetida del retrato del titular del documento que se reproduce una o varias veces. Se reduce en contraste y/o tamaño y se aplica utilizando la misma técnica de impresión que el retrato del titular o una diferente. Puede ubicarse en la página de datos personales u otras páginas del documento.

Fig. 1. Cuba. El pasaporte de servicio expedido en 2001. El reverso de la página de datos personales. La fotografía secundaria del portador. La impresión por láser. El sustrato de papel


Fig. 2. Nueva Zelanda. El pasaporte diplomático expedido en 2009. La página de datos personales. La fotografía secundaria del portador en la ventana transparente (b). Grabado por láser. El sustrato de polímero. La luz transmitida


Fig. 3. Corea. El pasaporte ordinario expedido en 2002. La página de datos personales. La fotografía secundaria del portador. La tinta transparente fluorescente en la luz ultravioleta. El sustrato de papel. La luz ultravioleta


Fig. 4. Suecia. El documento de identidad expedida en 2005. La fotografía secundaria del portador. La perforación por láser. El sustrato de polímero. La luz transmitida (b)


Fig. 5. Rusia. El pasaporte expedido en 2010. La página de datos personales. La fotografía secundaria del portador. La demetalización (el elemento de seguridad Blik creado por Goznak, Rusia). El sustrato de polímero. La luz oblicua


Fig. 6. Alemania. El pasaporte expedido en 2005. La página de datos personales. La fotografía secundaria del titular. El holograma en el laminado plástico. La luz oblicua


GRAVURE PRINTING

A printing technique which uses printing plates where printing elements are recessed as compared with spacing elements. Printing elements are in the form of small raster cells separated by thin dividers. A printing plate is produced on a metal cylinder. During the printing process ink is applied in plenty over the whole surface of the rotating plate. Then a special knife (scraper) removes the ink totally from spacing elements and its excess from printing elements. The ink is transferred to the substrate under the contact pressure.

Special features of the print:

  • no sharp contours and lines;
  • raster lines of spacing elements are visible in the areas of solid fill;
  • minor ink relief;
  • notched edge of an image or stroke contour.

Fig. 1. Republic of Belarus. Passport issued in 1997:
a — back endpaper (data page). Paper substrate; b — the same. Laminate overprint. Fuzzy image contours. White light; c — the same. UV light. Small cells left by spacing elements of the printing plate


Fig. 2. Azerbaijan. Passport issued in 2007:
a — data page. Insert. Paper substrate; b — the same. Text. Notched edge of a stroke contour. White light; c — the same. Text. Small cells left by spacing elements of the printing plate


GUILLOCHE

A graphic element in the form of a complex geometrical pattern which consist of repeated thin curved lines formed according to certain mathematical rules. Guilloche elements form rosettes, frames, borders, vignettes and elements of a background pattern. Guilloche elements can be both positive and negative.

Fig. 1. Russian Federation. Diplomatic passport issued in 1995:
a — front endpaper. Paper substrate; b — the same. Negative (light-coloured, non-printed lines on the dark background) and positive (dark lines on the light-coloured background) guilloche. Intaglio printing


Fig. 2. The Czech Republic. Diplomatic passport issued in 2005:
a — page 17. Fragment of the background pattern formed by guilloche elements. Paper substrate; b — the same. Zoomed fragment. Guilloche. Offset printing; c — the same. Front endpaper. Vignette; d — the same. Zoomed fragment. Vignette. Intaglio printing


HILO DE COSIDO

El material que se utiliza para unir hojas sueltas para formar un libro, cuadernillo o folletero. Consiste en así llamadas hebras sencillas que se retuercen o se pegan entre sí. Los hilos de cosido se difieren en el número de hebras, material, color y en el método de su formación. Los hilos sintéticos que tienen unos elementos de seguridad (luminiscencia bajo la luz ultravioleta y la luz infrarroja, etc.) se usan para coser pasaportes y otros documentos de viaje. Un hilo de coser es una sucesión de puntadas colocadas a intervalos regulares. Las puntadas de borde superior e inferior se pueden coser varias veces.

Fig. 1. Qatar. El documento de viaje expedido en 2016:
a — la página 25. El sustrato de papel; b — el hilo de cosido trenzado de un solo color. La imagen tomada bajo la luz blanca; c — lo mismo. La luz ultravioleta


Fig. 2. Los Estados Unidos de América. El pasaporte expedido en 2006:
a — la página 15. El sustrato de papel; b — el hilo de cosido de dos hilos bicolor. EL pespunte complicado. La luz blanca; c — lo mismo. Un fragmento en zoom; d — lo mismo. La luz ultravioleta


Fig. 3. Moldova. El pasaporte oficial expedido en 2015:
a — la página 17. El sustrato de papel; b — el hilo de cosido de tres hilos tricolor. Las puntadas de borde se cosen dos veces; c — lo mismo. La luz ultravioleta


Fig. 3. Dinamarca. El pasaporte de no ciudadano expedido en 1993:
a — la página 17. El sustrato de papel; b — lo mismo. El hilo de cosido térmico de polímero; c — lo mismo. Un fragmento en zoom


HILO DE SEGURIDAD

Una tira angosta de polímero o metálica incrustada en la hoja de papel durante el proceso de su fabricación. Se verifica en luz transmitida.

Existen dos tipos de los hilos de seguridad:

  • hilo latente que está completamente incrustado en el papel;
  • hilo ventana que aparece parcialmente en la superficie del papel. En luz reflejada luce como una línea punteada (discontinua), mientras en luz transmitida luce como una tira oscura y sólida.

Los hilos de seguridad pueden ser coloreados e incorporar características de microimpresión, tener propiedades ópticamente variables, luminiscentes en luz ultravioleta e infrarroja.

Fig. 1. Polonia. El pasaporte expedido en 2001:
a — la página 1; b, c — lo mismo. El hilo de seguridad latente. La luz transmitida (b). La sección transversal de la hoja de un documento (c)


Fig. 2. Kosovo. El pasaporte expedido en 2011:
a — la página 17; b, c, d — lo mismo. El hilo de seguridad latente. La luz transmitida (b). La luz infrarroja (c). RKS microimpresión sobre el hilo de seguridad (d)


Fig. 3. Rusia. El pasaporte expedido en 2010:
a — la página 45. El hilo de seguridad ventana metalizado con el efecto del cambio de color; b, c, d — lo mismo. La luz transmitida (b). El efecto del cambio de color (c, d) en diferentes ángulos de observación


Fig. 4. Suecia. El pasaporte provisional (de urgencia) expedido en 2011:
a — el averso; b — lo mismo. El hilo de seguridad MOTION®. La luz ultravioleta; c, d — the same. Transmitted light (c). White light (d). The image of a plane moves when changing the angle of observation or illumination (d)


HOLDER’S PORTRAIT

An image obtained as a result of taking a photograph of the holder's face. The holder's portrait can be printed by laser engraving, produced on the photographic paper, applied with the help of a printer (except for a dot matrix printer). It is either applied directly to the substrate (an integrated photograph), or glued, or attached with brackets, eyelets to the data page.

Fig. 1. Latvia. Diplomatic passport issued in 2015:
a — data page. Polymer substrate; b, c — the same. Holder's portrait. Laser engraving


Fig. 2. United Nations Organization. Laissez-passer issued in 2001:
a — data page. Paper substrate; b, c — the same. Holder's portrait. Color laser printing. Regular bitmap structure


Fig. 3. Somalia. National identity card issued in 2016:
a — front side. Polymer substrate; b, c — the same. Holder's portrait. Thermal dye sublimation printing, full-color


Fig. 4. Lithuania. Temporary passport issued in 2016.:
a — data page. Paper substrate; b, c — the same. Holder's portrait. Inkjet printing. Irregular bitmap structure


HOLOGRAM

A diffractive optically variable device. Optical properties of the hologram are defined in terms of diffraction of light going through a diffraction grating. Optical effects occur when changing the angle of observation or illumination. Holograms may contain nano-, microprinting, microimages, covert laser readable images, etc.

Classification of holograms by optical properties:

  • Reflection holograms form an image in reflected light. Aluminum foil or a transparent dielectric which reflects not more than 10-20% of light (transparent hologram) are used as a reflection layer.
  • Transmission holograms form an image in transmitted light.

KINEGRAM® is a patented solution produced by the Swiss manufacturer OVD Kinegram and used for protection of security documents and banknotes.

Fig. 1. Romania. Temporary passport issued in 2016:
a — page 2; b — the same. Holograms over the whole document page; c — the same. Diffractive identification device DID® (lower frame, fig. 1b); d — the same. Microtext (upper frame, fig. 1b)


Fig. 2. Iraq. Special passport issued in 2011:
a — page 3; b, c, d — the same. Zoomed fragment. View at different angles of observation


Fig. 3. Great Britain. Visa issued in 2004:
a — visa in the form of a sticker; b, c — the same. KINEGRAM®. View at different angles of observation; d — the same. Nanotext (zoomed fragment of the letter K)


HOLOGRAPHIC MICROPARTICLES OVDot

Faceted metallic particles with the size of 100-600 mcm which are randomly embedded in a substrate all over a document page. Holograms are applied over the surface of microparticles by the electron-beam lithography method and contain a nanoimage or a nanotext. Magnification mode shows how elements of a holographic image change their color at different angles of illumination and observation (fig. 1).

a

b

c

Fig. 1. South Africa. Passport:
а — page 17; b — holographic microparticle embedded in the paper substrate; c — nanotext «SOUTHAFRICA»

HOT FOIL STAMPING

An image formed with the use of a heated die (a form of letterpress printing) which forces the foil against the substrate. The image can be applied to paper, cardboard or a polymer substrate. Due to high pressure, foil particles penetrate deeply into the substrate, making mechanical separation virtually impossible.

Fig. 1. DPRK. Seaman’s passport issued in 2007:
a — data page. Paper substrate; b — the same. Laminate. Silver stamping; c — the same. Zoomed fragment


Fig. 2. Australia. Emergency passport issued in 2009:
a — cover; b — the same. Zoomed fragment. Silver stamping

Fig. 3. Belarus. Passport issued in 1996:
a — cover; b — the same. Zoomed fragment. Gold stamping


Fig. 4. Australia. Travel document (Convention of 28 July 1951) issued in 2009:
a — cover; b — the same. Zoomed fragment. Stamping with black foil


ILLUMINATION

Main terms and definitions:

  • pivot point — a point which is located on the surface of the object (document) and identified as a center when describing its characteristics;
  • axis of illumination — a line connecting the light source and the pivot point of the object;
  • axis of observation — a line connecting the optical system of the observer’s eyes and the pivot point of the object;
  • angle of illumination — an angle between the axis of illumination and the object surface;
  • angle of observation — an angle between the axis of observation and the object surface.

Types of light classified by the wavelength:

  • UV light — UVA (320–400 nm), UVB (290–320 nm), UVC (200–290 nm);
  • white light — visible light with the wavelength of 380–780 nm;
  • IR light — IR (740–1500 nm).

Illumination direction (azimuth):

  • front illumination is directed from the observer’s side towards the X-axis;
  • back illumination is directed from behind the object towards the X-axis;
  • side illumination is directed from the right or left sides of the object towards the Y-axis.

Types of light classified by the angle of incidence:

  • incident (60-90°);
  • oblique (30–60°);
  • sliding light (0–30⁰) is used for visualization of surface relief details;
  • bottom light is used for image visualization in transmitted light.

Illumination classified by the type of the light flow:

  • direct light is a harsh light that creates visible shadows on the object as well as glares on the surface;
  • diffused light is a soft indirect light that casts soft shadows and hides relief details of objects.


IMAGEN LATENTE LEGIBLE CON LÁSER

Una imagen protegida en un holograma que permanece invisible a simple vista y con un microscopio. Se visualiza en luz láser con la ayuda de dispositivos especiales. Se forma al grabar la imagen de un holograma mediante el método de la litografía por haz de electrones. Una imagen latente legible con láser es un área en la superficie del holograma en forma de un microrrelieve específico de 1 micrón de tamaño y menos de 1 micrón de profundidad. Un rayo láser, dirigido perpendicularmente a la superficie de esta zona, se refleja en los elementos de microrrelieve formando una imagen en la pantalla del dispositivo.

Fig. 1. El esquema de observación de una imagen latente legible con láser. Los rayos láser incidentes (las flechas rojas) y los rayos láser reflejados (las flechas verdes) visualizan las imágenes latentes legibles con láser


Fig. 2. Rusia. El pasaporte expedido en 1998:
a — la página de datos. El sustrato de papel; b — lo mismo. La zona de ubicación de la imagen latente legible con láser en el holograma (marcada con un marco); c, d, e — las imagines latentes legibles con láser observadas al exponerlas a un láser verde de 532 nm. Reveladas por el visualizador holográfico Regula 2305


IMPRESIÓN DE SEGURIDAD ENTRE CAPAS (SCP) DE LA TARJETA DE POLICARBONATO

Una imagen (patrón, caracteres alfanuméricos, etc.) colocada en la capa interior de una tarjeta de policarbonato multicapa. Se imprime con tintas especiales y se visualiza en luz transmitida en forma de una imagen oscura sobre un fondo de color claro. SCP también se considera una marca de agua pseudo.

Fig. 1. La estructura de una tarjeta de polímero multicapa. La capa con la impresión de seguridad entre capas


Fig. 2. Letonia. El pasaporte expedido en 2015:
a — el sustrato polimérico; b — lo mismo. La luz transmitida; c — lo mismo. Un fragmento en zoom. La impresión de seguridad entre capas de una tarjeta de policarbonato. La luz transmitida


Fig. 3. Nueva Zelanda. El pasaporte expedido en 2016:
a — la página de datos personales. El sustrato polimérico; b — lo mismo. La impresión de seguridad entre capas en forma de fronda de helecho. La luz transmitida (los contornos de la imagen están marcados con flechas)


IMPRESIÓN POR TRANSFERENCIA TERMICA / SUBLIMACIÓN TÉRMICA DE COLORANTES

Esta impresión se efectúa usando una cinta colorante colocada entre el cabezal térmico de impresión y el material receptor de impresión. La cinta colorante se hace de un fino material sintético cuya superficie exterior está cubierta de una capa de tinta sólida (color cyan, magenta, amarillo y negro).

En el proceso de la impresión el cabezal térmico se calienta y toca la superficie interna de la cinta colorante. Como resultado, la tinta sólida de la cinta se calienta y se evapora, pasando directamente de un estado sólido a un estado gaseoso (sin pasar por la fase líquida): se efectúa la sublimación térmica. Debido a la formación de una nube gaseosa de la tinta, la transferencia de la tinta se produce sin el contacto directo del cabezal de impresión y la cinta de tinta con la superficie del material receptor de impresión. Por lo tanto, los bordes de los elementos de trama se hacen borrosos.

Características de la impresión:

  • las imágenes en color de medios tonos presentan unas transiciones suaves en los tonos;
  • las letras y números monocromáticos tienen unos contornos en zigzag de elementos inclinados.

En el proceso de impresión por transferencia térmica, el cabezal de impresión térmica presiona la cinta de tinta directamente sobre la superficie del material receptor de impresión, formando una impresión sin que la tinta se convierta en un estado gaseoso. Como resultado, las imágenes en color de medios tonos obtienen una estructura regular en forma de puntos ovalados (son los rastros del cabezal de impresión).

Fig. 1. Zimbabue. El pasaporte expedido en 1998:
a — la página de datos personales. El sustrato de papel; b — lo mismo. La fotografía del titular. La impresión por transferencia térmica. Las transiciones suaves en los tonos, sin elementos de rastro; c — lo mismo. Los datos de personalización — un fragmento de texto. La impresión por transferencia térmica. Los contornos en zigzag de letras con elementos inclinados


Fig. 2. Grecia. El pasaporte expedido en 2014:
a — la página de datos personales. El sustrato de papel; b — lo mismo. La fotografía del titular. La impresión por transferencia térmica. La estructura regular de rastro de la imagen; c — lo mismo. Los datos de personalización: un fragmento de texto. La impresión por transferencia térmica. Los contornos en zigzag de letras con elementos inclinados. La cinta de tinta cubre la impresión con tinta de manera desigual, solo cuando contacta con el sustrato


IMPRESIÓN TERMOGRÁFICA / TERMOGRAFÍA

La impresión termográfica (estampado en caliente) es una tecnología de la postimpresión que deja un relieve táctil. El área recientemente impresa, todavía húmeda se espolvorea con un polvo de polímero fusible que se adhiere a la tinta. El exceso de polvo se elimina de las áreas no impresas por medio de una sacudida o un soplo. Después, el sustrato se calienta, y el polvo se funde formando un relieve elevado sobre el sustrato. Para la termografía se utiliza el polvo transparente, brillante o mate.

Fig. 1. Moldova. El documento provisional (de urgencia) de viaje expedido en 2013:
a — el documento de una sola hoja. El anverso. El sustrato de papel; b — lo mismo. Un fragmento en zoom. La termografía. El relieve elevado está formado por polvo de polímero fundido transparente. El brillo de polvo de polímero fundido


Fig. 2. Moldova. El visado:
a — el sustrato de papel; b — lo mismo. Un fragmento en zoom. La termografía. El relieve elevado está formado por polvo de polímero fundido transparente con un tinte amarillento (marcado con flechas); c — lo mismo. Un fragmento en zoom. La termografía. El brillo de polvo de polímero fundido que se extendió más allá de los bordes de las letras (marcado con una flecha). El ángulo de visión agudo


INCISIONES DE SEGURIDAD

El corte (perforación) parcial de la capa superior del sustrato o del revestimiento laminado que evita un daño estructural del documento hecho con el propósito de falsificarlo. Los cortes de rasgado se rompen si se intenta separar una capa superior o laminado del sustrato.

Fig. 1. Corea. El pasaporte expedido en 1998:
a — la página de datos personales. El sustrato de papel; b — lo mismo. Las incisiones de seguridad en el laminado plástico en forma de líneas discontinuas; c — lo mismo. Un fragmento en zoom


Fig. 2. Australia. La etiqueta de visado:
a — el sustrato de papel; b — lo mismo. Las incisiones de seguridad en forma de anillos concéntricos con las retículas en el centro; c — lo mismo. Un fragmento en zoom


Fig. 3. Los Emiratos Árabes Unidos. El pasaporte de emergencia expedido en 2016:
a — la etiqueta de papel sobre la página de datos personales. El sustrato de papel; b — lo mismo. Las incisiones de seguridad en forma de anillos concéntricos con la retícula en el centro; c — lo mismo. Las incisiones de seguridad en la parte superior de la página de datos personales


INKJET PRINTING

The print is formed of dots as a result of spraying ink from the printer nozzle onto the print-receiving surface.

Characteristic features of the print:

  • images are formed by randomly spread ink blots;
  • ink dots form something like a halo along the contours of letters and digits;
  • color halftone images do not have a regular structure.

Fig. 1. Estonia. Passport issued in 2009:
a — data page. Paper substrate; b — the same. Holder's portrait. Full-color inkjet printing; c — the same. Zoomed fragment. The print is formed by randomly spread colorful ink dots; d — the same. Personalization data. Zoomed fragment. Ink blots of various forms and sizes form a halo along the contours of the letters


INSERT

An additional element of a book block in the form of a separate sheet with numbered or unnumbered pages attached to the main block. Material and method of fixing an insert may differ from typical pages of a book block. One book block can contain more than one insert. The insert can be printed separately.

Types of inserts in travel documents:

  • multilayer integrated card with holder’s data;
  • multilayer polycarbonate sheet with an RFID chip;
  • paper sheet with or without lamination;
  • transparent polycarbonate sheet with a verification filter for visualizing a latent scrambled image.


INTAGLIO PRINTING

A method of printing from metallic printing plates where printing elements are located below spacing ones. The design is cut, scratched, or etched into the printing plate. The printing process is carried out using high-viscosity inks. The ink fills in the recessed areas of the printing plate and is transferred to the print-receiving material under high pressure (about 10000 kg / cm2). The paper substrate is significantly deformed.

Special features of the print:

  • the thick ink layer produces a tactile relief;
  • substrate deformation: concave on the reverse side of the page in the image area;
  • ink spreads at the edges of a print.

Fig. 1. Great Britain. Passport issued in 2010:
a — page spread (pages 2-3). Paper substrate; b — the same. Page 3. Intaglio prints (text) at the top of the page; c — the same. Zoomed fragment. Intaglio print. The arrows show ink spreads at the edges of the print. Oblique light; d — the same. Reverse side of the print. The arrows show substrate deformation in the direction of the front side of the print. Mirrored word OBSERVATIONS. Oblique light



INTERFERENCIA EN PELÍCULAS DELGADAS

La interferencia en películas delgadas es un fenómeno de superposición de dos o más ondas de luz que provoca su amplificación o reducción mutua dependiendo de la relación entre las fases de estas ondas. Un haz de luz 1 con una longitud de onda (λ) cae sobre la película con un ángulo (α) y se refleja en el punto A. Un haz de luz 2 cae sobre la película, se refleja desde su límite inferior en el punto B, se refracta en el punto C y regresa al aire (fig.1). La diferencia de trayectoria aparece entre dos haces 1 y 2 reflejados adyacentes. Un haz de luz 1 pasa la distancia igual al intervalo ABC multiplicado por el índice de refracción (n). Pero en el punto C una parte del haz de luz se refleja de nuevo hacia abajo, en el punto A1 se refleja hacia arriba, etc. De esta manera, la suma de muchas ondas se produce como el resultado de las consiguientes reflexiones de la luz incidente desde el límite inferior de la película transparente. Este efecto lo denominan “la interferencia de haces múltiples”.

Si el intervalo ABC es un número entero de longitudes de onda, sus picos y valles coincidirán y se producirá la amplificación de todas las ondas reflejadas (el máximo de la interferencia). Cuando la película se ilumina con la luz blanca, que consiste en ondas de diferente frecuencia y longitud, la luz se refracta en el límite entre los medios y se elimina una parte del espectro. El máximo de la interferencia se produce para una longitud de onda específica (roja, verde o azul) a un cierto espesor y ángulo de la película. En la luz reflejada, la película tendrá un color correspondiente a una cierta longitud de la onda. Este fenómeno lo denominan “los colores en las películas delgadas”.

Fig. 1. El esquema de la interferencia de haz múltiple:
λ — la longitud de la onda de la luz incidente; α — el ángulo de la incidencia; β — el ángulo de la refracción; n — el índice de la refracción; h — el espesor de la película.
Las condiciones del máximo de la interferencia: la coincidencia de picos y valles (fases) de las ondas 1, 2, 3

Fig. 2. Los colores en las películas delgadas.
El intervalo ABC es igual a la longitud de la luz roja: es alcanzado el máximo de la interferencia, las fases de las ondas reflejadas y refractadas son iguales. La película es de color rojo

IR FLUORESCENT INKS

Inks containing fluorescent pigments which glow when exposed to visible light of 400-530 nm. Fluorescence appears in IR light of 850-950 nm as bright light images on a dark background.

Fig. 1. Oman. Passport issued in 2014:
a — central page spread with a stitching thread. Paper substrate. White light; b — the same. IR fluorescent inks. A picture on the page spread, a stitching thread


Fig. 2. Slovenia. Diplomatic passport issued in 2009:
a — page 17. Paper substrate. White light; b — the same. IR fluorescent inks. Text, security fibers, a security thread


IR METAMERIC INKS

Inks which have similar spectral features in visible light (perceived as having the same color) but different under IR illumination (some inks absorb IR light, others reflect). When examining an image printed using IR metameric inks, only a part of the image is visible in IR light. This security feature is based on the ability of document materials and inks to absorb or reflect IR light.

Fig. 1. Brunei. Passport issued in 2008:
a — back endpaper. Paper substrate. White light; b — the same. Text fragments which absorb IR light look dark. The background image is transparent in IR light. IR light


Fig. 2. Macau. Passport issued in 2009:
a — page 48. Paper substrate. White light; b — the same. Fragments of the image and text are different in the degree of IR light absorption. So, they look semitransparent or dark on the light background. IR light


IRIDESCENT INK

Semitransparent ink with pearl luster caused by an interference structure of a thin film. The ink contains scaly mica pigments covered by a thin film of titanium dioxide (TiO2), ferric oxide (Fe2O3) or other metal oxides. When falling on pigments, one part of light is reflected, the other part is transmitted into the underlying layers. As a result, multiple reflection and transmission of light by different layers occur and result in interference. The luster is almost unnoticeable at a right angle of observation and illumination. When changing the angle of observation or illumination, the intensity of luster and the hue slightly changes.

Fig. 1. France. Emergency passport issued in 2006:
a — page 8. Paper substrate; b — the same. Zoomed fragment. Iridescent ink. View at a right angle of observation and illumination; c — the same. Zoomed fragment. Iridescent ink pigments


Fig. 2. Japan. Travel document for return issued in 2013:
a — folded document. Front side. Paper substrate; b — the same. The letters JPN printed with iridescent ink. Oblique light; c — the same. Zoomed fragment. Iridescent ink pigments


LAMINATE

A transparent polymer film applied on a document page in order to protect data entries against falsification. May cover the page from one or from both sides. In the latter case, laminate sheets are welded together and form a pouch. The laminate can also be integrated into the passport book by binding. By surface texture, laminates can be glossy, matte or bubble.

Fig. 1. France. Emergency passport issued in 2005:
a — data page. Paper substrate; b — the same. Glossy laminate is bound into the passport book


Fig. 2. Slovakia. Travel identity card issued in 1993:
a — matte laminate; b — the same. Top edge. The laminate base is integrated into the passport book (marked with an arrow)


Fig. 3. Japan. Passport issued in 2013:
a — data page. Paper substrate. Glossy laminate is not integrated into the passport book. The arrows show page fragments not covered with laminate; b — the same. The arrow shows a fragment without laminate


Fig. 4. Australia. Emergency passport issued in 2009:
a — data page. Paper substrate; b — the same. Bubble texture of laminate


Fig. 5. Azerbaijan. Passport issued in 2008:
a — paper substrate. The laminate is integrated into the passport book; b, c — the same. Laminate covers the card from both sides. Front side (b). Back side (c)


LAMINATE OVERPRINT

An image (alphanumeric data) which is applied to the inner surface of the laminate by various printing techniques using special protective inks. When trying to separate the laminate from the data page, the image is destroyed.

Fig. 1. Korea. Travel certificate issued in 2008:
a — data page. Insert. Paper substrate; b — the same. Laminate overprint. Zoomed fragment. Gravure printing


Fig. 2. Belarus. Official passport issued in 2011:
a — data page. Paper substrate; b — the same. Laminate overprint. Offset printing; c — the same. UV light


Fig. 3. Jamaica. Official passport issued in 2001:
a — data page. Insert. Paper substrate; b — the same. Fluorescent overprint. Offset printing. UV light; c — the same. Zoomed fragment. The image is applied to the laminate (not to the paper) as it extends beyond the limits of the paper sheet


LASER ENGRAVING

Applying an image or a photo, letters or figures on a paper or polymer substrate using the energy of a laser beam. A laser beam heats the surface of a substrate (e.g. polycarbonate) releasing carbon into the upper transparent layers. The released carbon is visualized in the form of black dots of different tones which form an image.

When the laser beam affects paper surface, its discoloration occurs, and the ink layer is removed.

Types of images created by laser engraving:

  • vector — when the laser outlines contours of letters or figures, or images with thin lines;
  • raster — when the laser forms a great number of dots applied with different density.

By relief:

  • flat (2D) — applied on materials with nontransparent surface;
  • raised (3D) — felt to touch.

Fig. 1. Slovenia. Official passport issued in 2016:
a — page 1. Paper substrate; b — the same. Laser engraving. Fragment of the blank number. Discoloration and slight charring of paper. Relief is felt to touch; c — the same. Vector image formed as a result of laser engraving on a paper substrate


Fig. 2. Montenegro. Passport issued in 2008:
a — data page. Polymer substrate; b — the same. Zoomed fragment. Holder's portrait. Flat laser engraving. Raster image; c — the same. Fragment of the date. Raised laser engraving. Felt to touch, has raised relief. The surface is foamed and melted by a laser beam


LASER PRINTING

The print is formed as follows: a laser beam illuminates the points on the photoreceptor drum that correspond to the symbols to be printed. The points acquire an electric charge and subsequently, tiny particles of powdered ink (toner) stick to them. The toner is transferred from the drum onto the paper and fixed on it when heated up to +200˚ C.

Characteristic features of the print:

  • strokes are lumpy in dark areas of the image and shiny in oblique light;
  • parched toner particles are scattered chaotically along the contours of letters and digits forming a halo around them;
  • toner particles appear on the non-printed areas of the substrate;
  • color and monochrome halftone images have a regular bitmap structure.

Fig. 1. Moldova. Passport issued in 2009:
a — data page. Paper substrate; b — the same. Zoomed fragment of personalization data Text. Monochrome laser printing. A halo of melted black toner particles at the edges of the stroke; c — holder's portrait. Full-color printing; d — the same. Zoomed fragment. The print has a bitmap structure in the form of a rosette. The rosette is formed by elements of cyan, magenta, yellow and black (CMYK) colors


LATENT FILTER IMAGE LFI

LFI — Latent Filter Image

An image which is applied by the slit raster technology. The scene of the image changes when changing the angle of observation. A latent filter image consists of a slit raster printed inside a transparent polycarbonate which serves as an optical filter and a scrambled image stripped from two initial images (fig. 1). Lightness of the image changes regarding to the background when changing the angle of observation. Latent (second) image is visualized at an acute angle of observation and printed by offset (fig. 2).

Fig. 1. Scheme of a latent filter image visualization:
1 — scrambled interlaced image stripped from initial images A and B;
2 — slit raster; 3 — initial images are visualized at different angles of observation

a

b

c

d

Fig. 2. Estonia. National identity card:
а — reverse side; b — latent filter image: «EST» abbreviation. View at a right angle; c — the same image. View at an acute angle of observation; d — the same image. Slit raster. View at a right angle of observation

LATENT IMAGE KIPP

(from German kippen – to tilt)

An image which consists of parallel lines that are perpendicular to the lines of the background. The latent image KIPP is applied using the intaglio printing plate and appears as an achromatic image in sliding light at an acute angle of observation. It can be visible due to the shadows cast by the raised lines of surface relief. When the document is rotated by 90° without changing the angle of observation, the latent image KIPP becomes either light, or dark compared to the background color.

Fig. 1. Scheme of observing the latent image KIPP


Fig. 2. Kuwait. Passport issued in 2017:
a — front endpaper. Paper substrate; b — the same. Area with a latent image. Latent image is almost invisible. Viewed at a right angle of observation and illumination; c — the same. Zoomed fragment. Parallel lines of the latent image are perpendicular to the lines of the background. Intaglio printing; d — the same. Latent image KIPP. Viewed at an acute angle in sliding light; e — the same. Viewed when the document is rotated by 90° without changing the angle of illumination and observation


LATENT IMAGE PEAK®

(PEAK — Printed and Embossed Anti-Copy Key, developed by Giesecke+Devrient)

An image is formed by two types of lines that are combined during the printing process: 1) parallel lines applied by blind embossing 2) one-color parallel lines of the background applied by offset printing. At a right angle of observation and illumination, the latent image PEAK® is almost invisible. When viewed in sliding light, the lines of the background are visualized on the ridges of relief lines applied by blind embossing and form the latent image PEAK®.

Fig. 1. Scheme of observing the latent image PEAK®


Fig. 2. Kosovo. Diplomatic passport issued in 2008:
a — front endpaper. Paper substrate; b — the same. Area with the latent image PEAK®. Viewed at a right angle of observation and illumination; c — the same. Zoomed fragment. The word KOSOVO is applied by blind embossing. The background (blue lines) is applied by offset printing; d, e — the same. Viewed at different angles of observation and illumination


LATENT MASKED IMAGE

An image formed by lines, strokes of a certain geometrical shape, or raster elements. The latent image is applied by the same printing technique as the background pattern and does not differ from it in color. Its contours are hardly visible to the naked eye. The image can be visualized as a letter, figure, or geometric shape under magnification in white light.

Fig. 1. Sudan. Passport issued in 2014:
a — page spread (pages 26–27). Paper substrate; b — the same. Page 27. Background pattern containing a latent image. The symbols SDN are formed by inclined strokes invisible to the naked eye against the background pattern. Offset printing; c — the same. Page 26. Background pattern containing a latent image. The background pattern masks the symbols SDN that are invisible to the naked eye. Offset printing; d — the same. Zoomed fragment. The symbols SDN are visible under magnification


LATENT MULTICOLOUR IMAGE

An image formed by parallel lines applied by blind embossing and multicolor parallel lines of the background pattern applied by offset printing. The lines are combined during the printing process. At a right angle of observation and illumination, the latent multicolor image is almost invisible. It is visualized in sliding light at an acute angle of observation. When the document is rotated clockwise without changing the angle of observation, the color of every element of the multicolor image changes.

Fig. 1. Scheme of observing a latent multicolor image


Fig. 2. Kosovo. Passport issued in 2011:
a — page spread (page 34 – back endpaper). Paper substrate; b — the same. Back endpaper. Latent multicolor image. Viewed at an acute angle in sliding light; c — the same. The color of the RKS symbols has changed. Viewed when the document is rotated by 90° clockwise without changing the angle of illumination and observation; d — the same. Zoomed fragment. The lines of the latent multicolor image are parallel with the lines of the background pattern


LATENT SCRAMBLED IMAGE

An image formed by strokes or raster elements that are printed in the background pattern or portrait so that the image is not visible to the naked eye. The image is pre-fragmented and encoded using special algorithms. A latent scrambled image is visualized and decoded with the use of decoding devices (filters for visualizing latent scrambled images) or special software.

Fig. 1. Ecuador. Diplomatic passport issued in 2015:
a — front endpaper. Paper substrate; b — the same. Background pattern containing a latent scrambled image. Rainbow printing. Viewed at a right angle of observation and illumination; c — the same. Latent scrambled image № 1 visualized with a filter; d — the same. Latent scrambled image № 2 visualized with a filter; e — the same. Back endpaper. Paper substrate; f — the same. Microprinting in the form of wavy lines containing a latent scrambled image. Intaglio printing. Viewed at a right angle of observation and illumination; g — the same. Latent scrambled image visualized with a filter


Fig. 2. Bulgaria. Passport issued in 2010:
a — data page. Paper substrate; b — the same. Invisible personal information on the holder's portrait. Inkjet printer. Decoded and visualized with the Regula Forensic Studio software


LENTICULAR TECHNOLOGY

A method of printing and visualizing an image using lenticular lenses which are used to produce printed images which seem to change or move when viewed from different angles. The term Lenticular is used to define the repeating rows of convex lenses on the front surface of a plastic sheet. The reverse side of the material, however, is a flat surface. Each lens magnifies and projects micro-slices of image data printed on the reverse side. The lenticular technology means that initial images are cut into stripes which are joined so that there is a pair of stripes under each lens — one stripe from one image and the other stripe from the other image. Each lenticular operates as a magnifier which magnifies and isolates only one of the initial images. Coded images are applied by means of printing or laser engraving.

Fig. 3. Latvia. Service passport issued in 2015:
a — data page. Polymer substrate; b — the same. Multiple laser image (MLI). Consists of two initial images: holder's photo and signature. Each image is clearly visible under a certain angle of observation; c — the same. Zoomed fragment. An array of parallel cylindrical lenses with relief surface. Felt to touch. Blind embossing

Fig 4. Estonia. Identity card issued in 2011:
a — front side. Polymer substrate; b — the same. DYNAPRINT® security feature. View at an observation angle of 45°. Image of a bird in the foreground; c — the same. Depending on the angle of observation, one or the other initial image is visible. View at an observation angle of 135º. Image of a flower in the foreground; d — the same. Scheme of forming a coded image. The initial images of the bird and the flower are cut into stripes. The stripes interchange


LETTERPRESS PRINTING

A printing technique when ink is applied to a substrate from a printing plate with printing elements raised above spacing elements. During printing spacing elements do not touch the print-receiving material. The process is carried out under high pressure (at least 15 kg/cm2) with the use of fast-drying inks.

Special features of the print:

  • uneven ink distribution in strokes: less ink in the middle than along the edges;
  • a rim formed by the ink along the edges of a stroke;
  • deformation of the print-receiving material: protuberance on the back side of a sheet and indentation on the front side of a sheet in the area where the print is applied.

Letterpress printing is often used for printing serial numbers, barcodes, and design elements of covers.

Fig. 1. Qatar. Travel document issued in 2005:
a — page 32. Paper substrate; b — the same. Serial number. Front side of the print. Letterpress. Uneven ink distribution in strokes. White light; c — the same. Substrate deformation: protuberance on the back side of a sheet caused by the pressure of the printing plate. Oblique light; d — the same. Zoomed fragment. A rim along the edge of the stroke (marked with arrows)


Fig. 2. China. Passport issued in 2013:
a — data page. Paper substrate; b — the same. Serial number. Two inks applied while using the Orlov printing method. Letterpress. White light; c — the same. UV light


LOMO

El borde del bloque de pasaporte donde se cosen todos los elementos tecnológicos de una libreta de pasaportes.

a

b

c

Fig. 1. Irlanda. El pasaporte expedido en 2013:
а — la parte frontal de la cubierta; b — la página doble central con el hilo de cosido; c — lo mismo, la vista superior

MAGNETIC INK

Ink containing ferromagnetic components which have a specific reaction to the external magnetic field. Images, inscriptions or symbols applied in such ink can be identified by special magnetic sensors or visualized by magneto-optical converters.

Fig. 1. Sweden. Alien's passport issued in 2006:
a — front endpaper. Paper substrate; b — the same. The document number and the background image are printed in ink which contains ferromagnetic components. Visualized by the magneto-optical scanner Regula 7701M


Fig. 2. Azerbaijan. Visa issued in 2012:
a — sticker. Front side. Paper substrate; b — the same. The document number and the barcode are printed in ink which contains ferromagnetic components. Visualized by the magneto-optical scanner Regula 7701M


MAGNETIC STRIPE

A medium in the form of a stripe with the limited storage space. A magnetic stripe is usually placed at the reverse side of a card. The data which has previously been coded recorded on magnetic stripes. The data reading process is carried out by using special devices – readers (fig. 1).

Fig. 1. The United States of America. Arizona. Identity card. Magnetic stripe at the reverse side of a card

MARCA DE AGUA

Un elemento de seguridad de papel visible en luz transmitida: la imagen se visualiza debido a diferentes densidades de papel. La marca de agua está formada en una banda de papel húmeda en la fabricación de papel y por medio de una variación de la densidad de fibrillas en ciertas áreas se convierte en una imagen. Las áreas más oscuras contienen más fibrillas. Las marcas de agua se difieren por varios criterios.

Por ubicación:

  •  General, cuando una imagen se repite con intervalos regulares ocupando toda la hoja.
  •  Local, cuando una imagen ocupa un determinado lugar de la hoja.

Por tono general de papel:

  •  Monotonal, consiste en elementos oscuros o claros de una imagen en comparación con el tono de papel general.
  •  Bitonal, consiste en elementos oscuros y claros de una imagen en comparación con el tono de papel general.
  •  Multitonal, consiste en elementos oscuros y claros de una imagen en comparación con el tono de papel general que se transforman de manera gradual.


METALLIC INK

Ink containing a fine-dispersed metal powder. It has a specific metallic gloss. Only gloss intensity changes when changing the angle of observation and illumination of the image applied in metallic ink. No significant changes in color are observed. Metallic inks look dark in IR light.

Fig. 1. Estonia. Alien's passport issued in 2014:
a — front endpaper. Paper substrate; b — the same. The coat of arms elements are applied in metallic ink of gold color; c — the same. Front endpaper. IR light


Fig. 2. New Zealand. Diplomatic passport issued in 2016:
a — page 27. Paper substrate; b — the same. Fragment of the see-through register applied in metallic ink of silver color; c — the same. In the bottom right corner, the see-through register looks dark on a light background. IR light



METAMERIC INK PAIR

Special security inks (usually a pair of inks) which look similar in one type of illumination (e.g. in visible light) but show a noticeable difference in another type of illumination (when using a light filter).

Fig. 1. Japan. Passport issued in 2013: back endpaper. Paper substrate
a — data page. Paper substrate; b — the same. Parts of the image are printed in different inks (metameric ink pair). In visible light there is no difference in the colour of image parts; c — the same. Image parts differ in colour. Viewed through a red optical filter


Fig. 2. Qatar. Travel document issued in 2016:
a — back endpaper. Paper substrate; b — the same. Parts of the image are printed in metameric inks. Offset printing; c — the same. A dark profile of a bird is clearly visible. Viewed through a red optical filter


Fig. 3. Japan. Passport issued in 2013:
a — page with an RFID chip. Hybrid substrate. The text DO NOT STAMP THIS PAGE is printed in metameric inks; b — the same. In the text DO NOT STAMP THIS PAGE the words do not differ in colour. White light; c — the same. The words STAMP and THIS differ in colour. Viewed through a red optical filter


MICROPRINT

An image (figure / symbol / text) being 0,15–0,3 mm high which is performed by means of printing, blind embossing, demetallization, holography and etc. Microprinting is widely used in security documents where it comes as a background, forms patterns and images, enhances protection of holograms, security threads, etc.

Types of microprinting:

  • positive — dark letters or figures on a light background;
  • negative — light letters on a dark background (so-called "reverse printing", demetallization).

Fig. 1. USA. Permanent residence permit issued in 2010:
a — back side. Polymer substrate; b — the same. Microprint. Stripe with micro images of the U.S. presidents; c — the same. Zoomed fragment. Portrait of Barack Obama


Fig. 2. Ukraine. Passport card issued in 2016:
a — front side. Polymer substrate; b — the same. Negative and positive microprinting. Offset printing


Fig. 3. Greece. Passport issued in 2006:
a — page spread (pages 16-17). Background pattern. Paper substrate; b — the same. The background pattern is formed by microprints. Offset printing


MOIRE VARIABLE COLOR (MVC)

(MVC — Moire Variable Colour, developed by GOZNAK, Russia)

An image formed by parallel lines (applied by blind embossing) which are located at an acute angle to multicolor parallel lines of the background pattern (applied by offset printing). The element is monochrome when viewed at a right angle of observation and illumination. Multicolor moire (rainbow) stripes appear when the image is viewed at an acute angle of observation and illumination. When the document is rotated clockwise without changing the angle of observation, the moire patterns appear and disappear from time to time.

Fig. 1. Scheme of observing the MVC


Fig. 2. Russian Federation. Passport issued in 2010:
a — page 3. Paper substrate; b — the same. MVC. The element is monochrome. Viewed at a right angle of observation and illumination; c — the same. Viewed at an acute angle in sliding light. Multicolor moire stripes are observed; d — the same. Zoomed fragment. Yellow and blue lines of the background pattern — offset printing. The lines applied by blind embossing are at an acute angle to the lines of the background pattern. View at a right angle of observation and illumination


MOTIVO DE COINCIDENCIA

Una imagen cuyas partes están impresas en el anverso y reverso de una hoja. En luz transmitida, los elementos de la imagen en el averso se complementan con los elementos impresos en el reverso. Como resultado, se forma una imagen completa sin importantes desplazamientos, superposiciones o espacios vacíos, visible sólo en luz transmitida.

Fig. 1. Serbia. El pasaporte de servicio expedido en 2008:
a — la página doble (páginas 16-17). El sustrato de papel; b — lo mismo. Motivo de coincidencia, el averso. La impresión offset; c — lo mismo. Motivo de coincidencia, el reverso. La impresión offset; d — lo mismo. Motivo de coincidencia. La luz transmitida. Los elementos del averso y del reverso de la hoja están alineados formando una imagen completa sin espacios, superposiciones y desplazamientos


MULTIPLE LASER IMAGE / CHANGEABLE LASER IMAGE (MLI / CLI)

A composite image which consists of several initial images. It is applied and visualized with the use of the lenticular technology. Depending on the angle of observation, one or the other initial image is visible. Consists of lenticular lenses which are embossed into the polymer substrate. Several initial images are cut into stripes and combined into one composite image which is applied by laser engraving under lenticular lenses. Initial images usually contain personal data.

Fig. 1. Scheme of MLI visualization


Fig. 2. Sweden. Emergency passport issued in 2012:
a — data page. Polymer substrate; b — the same. Multiple laser image. Visualization of the holder's portrait at a 45º angle of observation; c — the same. Visualization of the holder's date of birth (yy-mm-dd) at a 135º angle of observation; d — the same. The array of lenticular lenses is applied by blind embossing. Horizontal orientation of the array of lenses


Fig. 3. Finland. Identification card issued in 1999:
a — front side. Polymer substrate; b — the same. Multiple laser image. Visualization of the holder's date of birth at a 45º angle of observation; c — the same. Visualization of FIN abbreviation at a 135º angle of observation. Vertical orientation of the array of lenses


OFFSET PRINTING

A printing technique which uses printing plates where printing and spacing elements lie in one plane. Inks are transferred to the print-receiving surface not directly from the printing plate but via the offset cylinder covered with a rubber blanket.

Traditional offset is a printing technique that includes moistening. Moistening enables the separation of printing and spacing elements due to the difference in their physicochemical properties. The spacing elements attract water while the printing elements attract ink. Every time before ink is applied, the printing plate is dampened with water which adheres to the spacing elements. So they do not attract ink afterwards.

Characteristic features of traditional offset printing:

  • the substrate is not deformed;
  • ink in the strokes is evenly distributed, the thickness of the ink layer is constant;
  • paper fibers can be seen under the strokes.

Dry offset is a printing technique that does not include moistening. In this case, silicone is used to create a layer of spacing elements on the printing plate.

Letterset (indirect letterpress printing) is a technique which combines the elements of letterpress and offset printing. An image is transferred from the letterpress printing plate to the intermediate offset cylinder and then to the print-receiving material.

Letterset prints are characterized by an obviously thicker layer of ink along the boundaries of the print which is typical for letterpress printing (but not for traditional offset printing).

Fig. 1. Switzerland. Service passport issued in 2003:
a — back flyleaf. Paper substrate; b — the same. Background design pattern. Zoomed fragment. Offset printing. No relief. Even ink distribution. Paper texture is seen under the strokes


Fig. 2. Sweden. Emergency passport issued in 2005:
a — page 1. Paper substrate; b — the same. Text. Zoomed fragment. Letterset. A thick layer of ink along the boundaries of the print (marked with an arrow)



OPTICALLY VARIABLE IDENTIFICATION ELEMENT FEEL-ID

A composite security feature based on colour changing and thermochromic effect. It was developed by Giesecke&Devrient company. FEEL-ID has a multilayer structure: 1) The top layer is made using STEP security feature with liquid crystal pigments; 2) The middle layer is made of thermochromic ink; 3) The bottom layer contains laser-engraved identification information (holder's portrait, etc.).

FEEL-ID characteristic features:

  • its colour changes at different angles of observation and illumination (colour changing effect, STEP element);
  • identification information hidden beneath the thermochromic ink layer is revealed when exposed heat (thermochromic effect).

FEEL-ID element structure

a

b

c

d

e

f

Hungary. Passport (2006):
а — data page. FEEL-ID element location; b — FEEL-ID element viewed at a right angle of observation and illumination; c — the same image viewed at an acute angle of illumination and observation; d — view through a polarizer: the dark area on the right indicates that the light reflected from the FEEL-ID element is circularly polarized; e — thermochromic effect: when exposed to heat, thermochromic ink becomes transparent revealing the document holder's portrait; f — laser engraved holder's portrait on the bottom layer. View in IR 840 nm

OPTICALLY VARIABLE IDENTIFICATION ELEMENT FUSE-ID

A composite security feature with identification information about the document holder. FUSE-ID was developed by Giesecke&Devrient company. It is printed with optically variable ink (OVI) and laser engraved afterwards. The element is produced by a laser beam which moves sequentially over the image background area and leaves the image outline untouched. The laser energy discolors optically variable ink by changing its surface nanorelief and optical features. The image contrasts with the brightened background and looks darker. The image color is determined by interference effect which appears on the layered structure of ink pigments.

a

b

c

d

Fig. 1. Latvia. Passport:
а — data page, FUSE-ID element location; b — document holder's portrait viewed at a right angle under front illumination; c — the same image viewed at an acute angle of illumination and observation; d — scheme of image formation by laser engraving the background

OPTICALLY VARIABLE INK (OVI)

An ink that changes its color depending on the angle of observation and illumination. The ink contains a nontransparent scaly pigment with a layered structure that includes a reflective metallic layer, a transparent dielectric layer, and a translucent metallic layer. White light is partially reflected from the translucent metallic layer (surface layer) and partially from the reflective metallic layer (bottom layer). Interference and multiple reflections of light beams by the two reflective layers result in selective absorption of the waves that make up the white light spectrum. The reflected light waves cause the ink color we observe. The ink does not contain coloring pigments. It has metallic sheen. The ink color depends on the thickness of the dielectric layer (MgF2), the angle of illumination and the angle of observation.

Fig. 1. Scheme of OVI visualization. Structure of the ink pigment


Fig. 2. Greece. Passport issued in 2014:
a — data page. Paper substrate; b — the same. OVI: angle of illumination 90°, angle of observation 90°; c — the same. Change of color: angle of illumination 45°, angle of observation 45°; d — the same. Zoomed fragment. OVI pigments: metallic sheen, scaly shape, irregular outline, 100% opacity


OPTICALLY VARIABLE INK WITH EMBOSSING

A complex optically variable security element. It contains an image printed by an optically variable ink OVI which plays a role of the background for the second image applied by blind embossing.

A dual optical effect appears when viewed at different angles of observation and illumination: a color change of the background image and visualization of the second image due a treatment of light and the shade which appears at the ridges of relief elements. An image which applied by blind embossing is not visible at a right angle (fig. 1).

a

b

c

d

e

Fig. 1. Belgium. Passport:
а — data page; b — optically variable ink with embossing. View at a right angle of observation; c, d — the same image at different angles of observation and illumination. Colour and lightness changing effect of an image applied by blind embossing; e — optically variable ink used as a background and blind embossing applied over it

OPTICALLY VARIABLE INK WITH POLARIZING EFFECT STEP

An optically variable iridescent ink which changes its colour at different angles of illumination and observation. It contains liquid crystal pigments with periodic spiral molecular structure. Ink colour depends on the lead of the spiral and angle of illumination. Colour changing effect is achieved due to interference. Incident light reflected from the ink interacts with the spiral of a liquid crystal molecule and becomes polarized.

a

b

c

d

e

f

Latvia. Travel document (2015):
a - page 1, general view, STEP element location; b - observation of optically variable ink properties: colour changing effect at different angles of illumination and observation; c - STEP element at a right angle of observation and illumination; d — the same image at an acute angle of observation and illumination; e - ink structure: iridescent and liquid crystal pigments; f - view through a polarizing filter (dark area on the right) proves that the reflected light is polarized

OPTICALLY VARIABLE MAGNETIC INK (SPARK®, OVMI)

Dynamic color-shifting ink developed by the Swiss company SICPA. Pigments of the magnetic ink used in SPARK® are oriented with the help of the magnetic field so that when the angle of illumination or observation changes, the image changes its color. As result, there is a rolling-bar dynamic effect (a beam of light moving diagonally across the image). Is applied by screen printing, contains ferromagnetic pigments.

Fig. 1. Ireland. Official passport issued in 2013:
a — page spread (front endpaper – page 1). Paper substrate (front endpaper), polymer substrate (page 1); b — the same. Zoomed fragment. SPARK® security feature. Nontransparent metallized pigments; c, d, e, f — the same. A rolling-bar dynamic effect (a beam of light moving diagonally across the image). Color shifting. View at different angles of observation


OPTICALLY VARIABLE PRINTED IMAGE DYNAPRINT®

A composite image which consists of several initial images. It is applied and visualized with the use of the lenticular technology. Depending on the angle of observation, one or the other initial image is visible. The tone, brightness and color saturation of symbols in relation to the background may change. Consists of lenticular lenses which are embossed into the polymer substrate. A number of initial images are cut into stripes and combined into one composite image which is printed under lenticular lenses. Developed by the Swiss company TRÜB AG.

Fig. 1. Estonia. Identification card issued in 2002:
a — back side. Polymer substrate; b — the same. DYNAPRINT® security feature. View at an observation angle of 45º. Light-colored EST symbols on a dark background; c — the same. View at an angle of 135°. Blue EST symbols on a dark background


Fig. 2. Estonia. Identification card issued in 2011:
a — front side. Polymer substrate; b — the same. DYNAPRINT® security feature. View at an observation angle of 45°. Image of a bird in the foreground; c — the same. Depending on the angle of observation, one or the other initial image is visible. Image of a flower in the foreground. View at an observation angle of 135º. Image of a flower in the foreground


ORLOV PRINTING

A method of a single-run multi-color printing invented by Ivan Orlov in 1890 in Russia. It is used for getting prints in which the change of color in strokes is sharp. No displacement, no superimposition or breaking of color. The peculiarity of this printing method: the formation of separate ink layers on color-separated plates and the transfer of the inks to the common plate and then to the receiving surface.

Fig. 1. Russian Federation. Passport issued in 2010:
a — page spread (pages 4-5). Paper substrate; b — the same. Background design pattern. Orlov printing. Sharp and accurate change of color in lines; c — the same. Zoomed fragment. Red and blue lines do not break, overlap or displace in the area where two colours meet


Fig. 2. Japan. Passport issued in 1999:
a — page spread (page 32 - back endpaper). Paper substrate; b — the same. Background design pattern. Orlov printing; c — the same. Zoomed fragment. Sharp and accurate change of color in lines. The colored lines do not break or displace. The arrow marks the area of the color change


PASSPORT

An official document certifying the holder's identity and entitling them to travel to and from foreign countries. It is issued to all citizens in accordance with national legislation. The passport is a booklet, in either hard or soft cover, loaded with security features. It contains personal data of the holder, information about the issuing country and authority, visas, stamps, and other marks. As a rule, each country issues several types of passports: a passport, a diplomatic passport, a service passport, an official passport, an alien’s passport, etc.

Passports differ in the ways of personalization and methods of data processing:

  • passports without the MRZ and embedded microchips;
  • passports with the MRZ containing mandatory and optional data formatted for machine reading using OCR methods;
  • passports with an embedded electronic microprocessor chip (ePassport) which contains secured graphic and text data about the holder and the document itself.

Fig. 1. Haiti. Passport issued in 1992. No embedded microchip:
a — front cover; b — data page without the MRZ. Paper substrate


Fig. 2. Kuwait. Passport issued in 2017. Document with an embedded microchip (ePassport):
a — front cover. The biometric symbol on the passport cover (marked with an arrow); b — data page with the MRZ. Paper substrate



PASSPORT BOOK

A type of a document construction which consists of a folded block of sheets stitched in the spine. It is binded with the help of endpapers or other techniques and then cut from three sides. Additional elements of a passport book are inserts.

PATRÓN DE FONDO

La imagen o el patrón ornamental que sirve de fondo a otras imágenes, números de serie, textos, etc. Esto hace que el fraude de documentos sea más complicado, ya que, en el caso de borrado o grabado mecánico de los datos de texto, o de los elementos de seguridad, el patrón de fondo resulta dañado.

El patrón de fondo está compuesto de:

  • líneas finas paralelas o entrelazadas que pueden tener un grosor variable y formar elementos pseudo-tridimensionales formados por líneas de intersección (retícula regular). Las líneas de la retícula pueden ser de un color o de varios;
  • microimpresión;
  • elementos de diseño formados por colores sólidos;
  • elementos especiales de trama, anticopia y guilloches.

Los patrones de fondo se imprimen en offset, en arco iris y en en estarcido (Orlov impresión).

Fig. 1. Belarús (antigua Bielorrusia). El pasaporte diplomático expedido en 2010:
a — la pág. 31. El sustrato de papel; b — lo mismo. El patrón de fondo en forma de cuadrícula de líneas rectas. La impresión de arco iris


Fig. 2. Túnez. El pasaporte diplomático expedido en 2003:
a — el papel de fondo. El sustrato de papel; b — lo mismo. El patrón de fondo con elementos pseudo-tridimensionales formados por líneas de intersección. La impresión de arco iris


Fig. 3. Kuwait. El pasaporte expedido en 2005:
a — el soporte de papel. El sustrato de papel; b — lo mismo. El patrón de fondo está formado por colores de fondo sólido. La impresión de arco iris


Fig. 4. Moldova. El permiso de residencia permanente para extranjeros expedido en 2016:
a — el sustrato de polímero; b — lo mismo. El patrón de fondo está formado por microimpresión. La impresión del arco iris


PENETRATING INK

Ink that contains a penetrating dye that goes into the fibers of the print-receiving material and shows through to the back of the document. It is usually used in passports and travel documents for applying numbers by letterpress printing.

Fig. 1. Hungary. Passport issued in 2002:
a — page spread (page 32 – data page). Paper substrate (page 32) and polymer substrate (data page); b — the same. Blank number. Front side. Penetrating ink; c — the same. Document number. Back side. Traces of red dye on the reverse side of the print. Oblique light; d, e — the same. Zoomed fragment. Front (d) and back (e) side of the print. Letterpress


Fig. 2. Slovenia. Travel document (Convention of 28 July 1951) issued in 2016:
a — page spread (front endpaper – page 1). Paper substrate; b, c — the same. Blank number (b). Zoomed fragment of the symbol (c). Penetrating ink. Letterpress


PERFORATION

Holes in the substrate, which are arranged in a certain order. They can form a pattern (a holder’s portrait, a document number, etc.).

Perforation can be laser or mechanical.

Laser perforations are created with a laser beam. In this case the holes are of proper shape, have smooth edges and no ridges. The diameter of laser-perforated holes is smoothly reduced from the first perforated page of the document to the last one. Traces of burning left by the laser beam are visible around the edges of the holes. The holes may differ in form: round, triangular, square, asterisk-shaped, etc.

Mechanical perforation is performed with the help of needles or pins. Consequently, ridges are felt to touch on the back of the substrate.

Fig. 1. Australia. Travel document (Convention of 28 July 1951) issued in 2009:
a — additional page 3. Paper substrate; b — the same. Document number. Laser perforation. Traces of burning (marked with arrows) left by the laser beam are visible around the edges of the holes


Fig. 2. Republic of Belarus. Passport issued in 1997:
a — page 16. Paper substrate; b — the same. Document number. Mechanical perforation. Front side. Indentation of the substrate at the edges of the holes; c — the same. Back side (page 15). Ridges at the edges of the holes (marked with an arrow) left by the perforating tool


Fig. 3. Sweden. Passport issued in 2012:
a — data page. Polymer substrate; b — the same. Secondary image of the holder. Laser perforation. Transmitted light; c — the same. Laser-perforated holes. Flat, smooth edges. Transmitted light


PHOTOCHROMIC INK

An ink containing photochromic pigments which change their color when exposed to UV light. After the UV light source is removed, the image printed in photochromic ink stays visible for some time and then becomes pale and disappears. This process can be repeated an endless number of times.

Fig. 1. Gambia. Passport issued in 2002:
a — data page. Paper substrate; b — the same. Image printed in photochromic ink. UV light; c — the same. Zoomed fragment. View in white light, 10 seconds after the UV light source is removed


Fig. 2. Gabon. Passport issued in 2009:
a — data page. Paper substrate; b — the same. Image printed in photochromic ink. UV light; c — the same. View in white light, 10 seconds after the UV light source is removed


PHOTOGRAPHIC PROCESS

A process that allows obtaining images by an optical device on a light-sensitive film and transferring them to photographic paper by chemical means. Photographic paper is covered with a photosensitive emulsion containing silver bromide crystals that are less than 0.001 mm in size. After chemical treatment, sediments of tiny silver particles are formed in the areas of the emulsion that have been exposed to light. These fragments become blurred and nontransparent. The areas that have not been exposed to light become clear and transparent.

Special features of the obtained image:

  • irregular structure in the form of chaotically arranged clouds of tiny spots;
  • gradual change of color, no raster.

Fig. 1. Belarus. Passport issued in 1997:
a — data page. Paper substrate; b — the same. The photo is glued to the data page; c — the same. Zoomed fragment. Gradual change of color, no raster


PIGMENTOS FLUORESCENTES DE PAPEL (HI-LITES)

Los pequeños pigmentos coloreados o descoloridos de diferentes tamaños incrustados aleatoriamente en la pasta de papel durante la formación de la hoja de papel. Los pigmentos brillan bajo la luz ultravioleta.

Fig. 1. Grecia. El pasaporte expedido en 2014:
a — la página 17. El sustrato de papel. La luz ultravioleta (365 nm); b — lo mismo. Los pigmentos fluorescentes (hi-lites) de diferentes colores se distribuyen aleatoriamente en la superficie de la página; c — lo mismo. Un fragmento en zoom. Los pigmentos fluorescentes de papel (hi-lites) de diferentes tamaños y formas


PLANCHETTES

Thin round or many-sided discs 1-4 mm in size which are made of polymer or metallized material. Planchettes are embedded into the substrate surface during the paper manufacturing process. They are placed randomly or located in a certain area of a sheet. Planchettes can be colorless, colorful, luminesce in UV light, have holographic effects, contain microprinting.

Fig. 1. Australia. Passport issued in 2009:
a — page 19. Paper substrate; b — the same. Colorless planchette; c — the same. Planchette with microprinting in the form of AUS symbols which luminesce in UV light


Fig. 2. USA. Passport issued in 1994:
a — data page. Paper substrate; b — the same. Planchettes with holographic effect located in the upper part of the data page


POLARIZING FILTER

An optical device which transforms unpolarized light passing through it into polarized light. It is used as an analyzer for examination of light reflected from ink or thin-film coating. It blocks light rays of a specific polarization direction and at the same time it lets light rays of other polarization directions pass. A polarizer is placed between the examiner and examined object and the intensity of transmitted light is observed. If the examined light becomes dark, it means that the object reflects polarized light. If the intensity of the transmitted light does not change or changes slightly, it means that the examined light is not polarized.

A polarizer helps to determine if an ink or polymer coating contains liquid crystal pigments which polarize the light passing through them.

a

b

c

d

e

Operation principle of a polarizing filter. Scheme:
a — the light is not polarized: the polarizer lets the light rays pass; b — the light is polarized: the polarizer blocks linearly polarized light; c — circular polarizer for document authenticity verification (R. L. van Renesse. Optical Document Security. Boston | London. 2005. p.351), front side; d — the same image, reverse side; e — STEP element analysis: the light is polarized, the polarizer blocks the light reflected from the ink layer (dark window on the right). Conclusion: the ink contains optically active substances — liquid crystals which circularly polarize reflected light

PORTADA

Un revestimiento externo de documento. Es un elemento de diseño en forma de una hoja de papel grueso, plástico o cartón recubierto con un material sintético. Las imágenes y el texto del anverso de la portada se aplican mediante estampación en lámina, gofrado ciego o impresión en tinta. La impresión con tintas luminiscentes UV o anti-Stokes es un elemento de seguridad adicional para la portada. Por las propiedades de revestimiento del documento, las portadas pueden ser blandas (se doblan fácilmente) y duras (se doblan con esfuerzo). La portada se une al bloque de libro con pegamento, grapas o hilo térmico.

Fig. 1. Dinamarca. El documento de viaje (la Convención de 28 de julio de 1951) expedido en 1993:
a — la portada de polímero blando sin guardas. La portada está unida al bloque de libro con un hilo térmico; b — lo mismo. Las páginas extendidas de un libro de pasaporte; c — lo mismo. El elemento de diseño de la portada. El gofrado y la impresión tipográfica


Fig. 2. Mongolia. El pasaporte diplomático:
a — la portada; b — lo mismo. Las páginas extendidas. La portada está unida al bloque con guardas (están marcadas con flechas); c — lo mismo. El material de la portada. La textura de cuero; d — lo mismo. La estampación con lámina dorada


Fig. 3. Suiza. El pasaporte provisional expedido en 2003:
a — la tela sintética recubre la portada blanda; b — lo mismo. La textura de la portada. El gofrado en forma de cruces e impresión en tinta blanca; c — lo mismo. La estructura de la portada. El borde superior. La portada está unida al bloque de libro con un hilo; d — lo mismo. El anverso de la portada en luz ultravioleta


RAINBOW EFFECT ON LAMINATE

Thin-film coating in the form of a stripe, text or image with the effect of interference color change under different angles of observation and illumination. Does not contain coloring pigments. The coating looks transparent in diffused light. In direct incident light the coating looks bronze red when viewed at a right angle. In oblique light the color of the coating changes to green when viewed at an acute angle.

Fig. 1. Visualization scheme of the color changing effect. The angle of illumination is equal to the angle of observation


Fig. 2. Sweden. Service passport issued in 2001:
a — page spread (pages 2–3). Rainbow effect on laminate (marked with a frame); b — the same. Page 2. Angle of illumination — 90°, angle of observation — 90°; c — the same. Color change effect. Angle of illumination — 45°, angle of observation — 45°; d — the same. Zoomed fragment. Structure of thin-film coating


RAINBOW PRINTING

A special security printing method using one printing plate to obtain prints where one colour gradually merges into another. The printing is carried out with several inks from one color box divided by plates. Special rollers with fixed axial displacement in horizontal direction are used for printing.

Fig. 1. Republic of Belarus. Passport issued in 1997:
a — page spread (front endpaper – page 1). Paper substrate; b — the same. Background pattern. Rainbow printing. The violet color of lines gradually merges into red


Fig. 2. Switzerland. Diplomatic passport issued in 2003:
a — page spread (data page – page 1). Paper substrate (page 1), polymer substrate (data page); b — the same. Rainbow printing. The green color gradually merges into red


RETROREFLECTIVE COATING

Multilayer coating that includes optical elements with retroreflective effect.

It consists of several layers:

  • layer with microlenses (microbeads);
  • layer with graphic images;
  • reflective layer.

When the coating is illuminated by parallel (coaxial) light beams, light semi-transparent images contrasting with the background are visualized (fig. 2). Microbeads focus the light beams so that reflected light returns towards the light source providing a clear visual perception of the image.

Fig. 1. Structure of retroreflective coating


Fig. 2. Netherlands. Travel document for aliens issued in 1995:
a — data page. Paper substrate; b — the same. Retroreflective image. Coaxial light; c — the same. Laminate. Surface microrelief; d — the same. The top layer consists of microbeads (marked with arrows). Cross-section


RETÍCULA ANTICOPIA

Una imagen de fondo formada por elementos de trama o trazos que forman una retícula. Cuando se copia/escanea un documento, se forma un texto ("COPY", "VOID", etc.) en la copia/imagen, que es invisible a simple vista, o moiré en forma de unas líneas iridiscentes, rayas claras y oscuras, manchas y otras imágenes dispersas.

Fig. 1. Egipto. El pasaporte especial expedido en 1999:
a — la página 52. El sustrato polimérico. La zona con la retícula anticopia está resaltada por un marco; b — lo mismo. La copia en blanco y negro obtenida en la fotocopiadora. La palabra COPY en la parte inferior de la página tiene contornos oscuros, representados cuando se copia con una resolución 200 dpi; c — lo mismo. Los caracteres de COPY se aplican en trazos oblicuos con una alta resolución y no son visibles a simple vista. La impresión offset


Fig. 2. Letonia. El pasaporte expedido en 2002:
a — la página de datos. El sustrato de papel. Un fragmento de la retícula de anticopias está resaltada por un marco; b — lo mismo. El fragmento ampliado de la retícula anticopia. Impresión en offset; с — lo mismo. Al copiar/escanear a 200 dpi se puede ver el moiré en forma de rayas oscuras y claras orientadas en diferentes direcciones. Aparece como resultado de la superposición de dos estructuras regulares: los trazos de la imagen impresa original y los elementos de la matriz de detección de luz (CCD) de los dispositivos de copia y escaneo digital


REVESTIMIENTO DE BARNIZ

Una película protectora transparente con grosor de 20 a 40 micrómetro, invisible a simple vista en ángulo recto. La misma protege el sustrato de la humedad evitando el borrado de tinta. El revestimiento de barniz se visualiza como un revestimiento con un ligero brillo visible en un ángulo agudo. Se aplica sobre una imagen impresa o crea una imagen descolorida independiente.

a

b

Fig. 1. Bélgica. La matrícula de registro de automotor:
а — la extensión exterior de un cuadernillo; b — el revestimiento de barniz rectangular que cubre la parte derecha del número 714980 aplicado por tipografía

SELLO / ESTAMPA

El sello, la impresión, la marca o relieve formado como resultado de presionar con una herramienta especial (cuño) sobre un sustrato de papel.

Tipos de sellos, según el método de su aplicación:

  • sellos de tinta: las impresiones planas sobre el sustrato;
  • sellos en seco: las impresiones en relieve sin utilizar una tinta.

El sello seco es bien visible con la luz rasante (oblicua), también se percibe por el tacto. La deformación del sustrato se observa tanto en la parte frontal como en la parte posterior de la hoja. Los elementos en relieve en la parte delantera son absolutamente similares a los elementos abollados en la parte posterior.

Fig. 1. Azerbaiyán. El pasaporte expedido en 2007:
a — la página doble (páginas 2-3). El sustrato de papel; b — lo mismo. Un sello de tinta; c — lo mismo. Un fragmento en zoom. Sin relieve


Fig. 2. Vietnam. El pasaporte expedido en 1993:
a — la página doble (páginas 2 y 3). La fotografía del titular está pegada y estampada; b — lo mismo. El sello en seco; c — lo mismo. Un fragmento en zoom. La imagen de un relieve convexo en la superficie está tomada con la luz rasante (oblicua)


SERIGRAFÍA

Una técnica de impresión que permite obtener impresiones empujando tinta a través de la placa impresora. Se utiliza una pantalla de malla como placa de impresión. Está hecha de seda natural, tela sintética o hilos de metal. Los elementos espaciadores están cubiertos por una capa que no deja pasar la tinta de impresión. Los elementos de impresión no están cubiertos. Durante el proceso de impresión, una fina capa de tinta es empujada uniformemente a través de la pantalla de malla por una escobilla de goma o polímero sobre el material receptor de impresión. La misma técnica se utiliza para imprimir imágenes que no contienen líneas finas o pequeños detalles.

Características especiales de la impresión:

  • sin presión y deformación del sustrato;
  • capa de tinta gruesa (el grosor de la capa corresponde al grosor de la placa impresora);
  • bordes irregulares o en zigzag de la imagen.

Fig. 1. Eslovaquia. El documento de viaje (Convención de 28 de julio de 1951) expedido en 2002:
a — la página de datos personales. El sustrato de papel; b — lo mismo. La sobreimpresión de laminado plástico. OVI (la tinta ópticamente variable). La serigrafía; c — lo mismo. La sobreimpresión de laminado plástico. La serigrafía. El borde en zigzag de la imagen. La capa de tinta gruesa


SUSTRATO

Un material especial que se utiliza para producir los documentos, el fondo necesario para aplicar las imágenes e incrustar los elementos de seguridad.

Sus tipos principales

El papel es una lámina delgada (4-400 mcm) que consiste principalmente en pequeñas fibras vegetales especialmente tratadas que están unidas y cosidas. Un papel especial se utiliza para fabricar documentos y papeles de valor. Contiene elementos de seguridad como las marcas de papel, las fibrillas de seguridad coloreadas y los hilos de seguridad, etc. Por lo general, este papel no brilla bajo la luz ultravioleta, contiene suplementos especiales y componentes químicos que dificultan los borrados mecánicos y químicos y otros intentos de falsificación.

El papel fotográfico es un material no transparente sobre un sustrato de papel con productos químicos sensibles a la luz que se utiliza para obtener una imagen fotográfica positiva.

Los materiales poliméricos son: acrilonitrilo butadieno estireno, poliéster, policarbonato, cloruro de polivinilo.

Las telas son materiales de revestimiento natural o sintético, cartón, piel u otros que se usan para fabricar documentos.

TARJETA

Tipo de construcción de documentos en forma de una hoja rectangular de tamaño estándar.

Según la norma ISO/IEC 7810, existen 4 formatos de tarjetas de identificación:

Formato Tamaño Uso habitual
ID-1 85.60 mm×53.98 mm Tarjetas de identidad, licencias de conducir
ID-2 105 mm×74 mm Tarjetas de identidad, licencias de conducir, documentos de automotores, visados
ID-3 125 mm×88 mm Pasaportes (inserciones de plástico)
ID-000 25 mm×15 mm Tarjetas SIM

Una tarjeta puede ser fabricada de un material monocapa o multicapa.

Tipos de tarjetas:

  • sin datos digitales;
  • con código de barras;
  • con banda magnética;
  • con chip;
  • combinadas.

Fig. 1. Alemania. La tarjeta de identidad (el formato ID-2) expedida en 2007:
a — el anverso. El sustrato de papel de doble capa; b — lo mismo. El laminado transparente cubre ambas caras del sustrato de papel de la tarjeta; c — lo mismo. La vista transversal


Fig. 2. Moldova. La tarjeta de identidad (el formato ID-1) expedida en 2015:
a — el anverso. El sustrato de polímero multicapa; b — lo mismo. El reverso. El código de barras


Fig. 3. Irlanda. La tarjeta de pasaporte (el formato ID-1) expedida en 2015:
a — el anverso. El sustrato de polímero multicapa; b — lo mismo. El reverso. La banda magnética se encuentra en la parte superior de la tarjeta


Fig. 4. Croacia. La tarjeta de identidad (el formato ID-1) emitida en 2015:
a — el sustrato de polímero multicapa. La tarjeta con el chip de contacto; b — lo mismo. El reverso


TECNOLOGÍA DE TRAMA HENDIDURA

Un método de impresión y visualización de imágenes utilizando una trama de hendidura que permite obtener un efecto de cambio de imagen dependiendo del ángulo de observación. Una trama de hendidura (un análogo óptico de un lenticular) es una película transparente con un patrón impreso que consiste en paralelas bandas alternas transparentes y no transparentes (opacas). Por debajo de la trama de hendidura de manera alterna se imprime una imagen codificada (el principio de la codificación es el mismo que en la tecnología lenticular).

Dependiendo del ángulo de visión, solo una de las bandas de la imagen codificada es proyectada a través de las bandas transparentes, mientras que las bandas opacas bloquean la visualización de la otra banda. Las imágenes se aplican mediante la impresión offset o el grabado láser en relieve (fig. 1–2).

a

b

Fig. 1. El esquema de la tecnología de trama hendidura:
1 — las imágenes iniciales A y B divididas en un número de bandas que es múltiplo del número de lentes; 2 — la trama de hendidura; 3 — la imagen alterna codificada

Fig. 2. El esquema de la visualización de imágenes en diferentes ángulos de observación:
1 — la imagen codificada; 2 — la trama de hendidura. Las imágenes A y B se visualizan de manera alterna en diferentes ángulos de observación

TINTA ANTI-STOKES

La tinta contiene cristales de metales de tierras raras (iterbio, tulio, etc.) que presentan una luminiscencia en el espectro visible cuando está expuesta a una luz infrarroja de alta intensidad en el rango de 970-990 nm.

Fig. 1. Los Estados Unidos de América. El pasaporte expedido en 2006:
a — la portada. La estampación en oro. La luz blanca; b — lo mismo. Anti-Stokes, la luminiscencia verde: el texto, el escudo, el símbolo biométrico del documento de viaje


Fig. 2. Rusia. El permiso de residencia a un apátrida expedido en 2012:
a — el soporte de papel. El sustrato de papel. El marco decorativo color verde, la impresión calcográfica. La luz blanca; b — lo mismo. Anti-Stokes, la luminiscencia verde y roja del marco guilloché


Fig. 3. Polonia. El pasaporte de servicio expedido en 2012:
a — el soporte de papel. El sustrato de papel. La luz blanca; b — lo mismo. Anti-Stokes, la luminiscencia verde sobre toda la hoja del documento


Fig. 4. Polonia. El visado emitido en 2011:
a — el sustrato de papel; b — lo mismo. Anti-Stokes, la luminiscencia verde del número


TINTA FLUORESCENTE

La tinta que contiene luminóforos. Una vez expuesta a la luz ultravioleta (250-380 nm), los luminóforos transforman la luz ultravioleta en la luz fluorescente de diferentes colores visibles a simple vista.

Fig. 1. Kosovo. El pasaporte expedido en 2013:
a — la página de datos personales. El sustrato de papel; b — lo mismo. La luz ultravioleta (365 nm); c — lo mismo. La luz ultravioleta (254 nm)


Fig. 2. Hungría. El pasaporte de servicio expedido en 2012:
a — la página de datos personales. El sustrato híbrido; b — lo mismo. La tinta fluorescente: una transición suave a color en la dirección vertical. Impresión arco iris. La luz ultravioleta (365 nm); c — lo mismo. La luz ultravioleta (254 nm)


TINTA TERMOCRÓMICA

La tinta que cambia su color o se vuelve transparente por los cambios de la temperatura. El efecto termocrómico es causado por cambios en la composición química o las propiedades físicas de los pigmentos termosensibles. La tinta termocrómica puede tener más de dos cambios de color a diferentes temperaturas.

Fig. 1. Irlanda. La tarjeta de pasaporte expedida en 2015:
a — el anverso. El sustrato polímero; b — lo mismo. La imagen impresa con la tinta termocrómica. El aspecto a una temperatura de aproximadamente 20˚С; c — lo mismo. El aspecto a una temperatura de 40˚С. El cambio de la transparencia


Fig. 2. Irlanda. El pasaporte expedido en 2013:
a — la página 6. El sustrato de papel; b, c, d — lo mismo. La imagen impresa con la tinta termocrómica. El cambio de color (gris – verde – amarillo) a medida que la temperatura aumenta hasta un 40˚С; e — lo mismo. Un fragmento en zoom. Los pigmentos termosensibles de la tinta. El aspecto a una temperatura de aproximadamente 20˚С; f — lo mismo. Un fragmento en zoom. Los pigmentos termosensibles de la tinta a una temperatura de 40˚С


TÉCNICAS DE ENCUADERNACIÓN

Acto de unir las hojas de un bloque de libro plegado con la cubierta.

Las principales técnicas utilizadas para la encuadernación de un bloque de pasaporte:

  • cosido lateral con hilo;
  • cosido con hilo;
  • cosido a caballete.

En cuanto al cosido lateral con hilo, las hojas de un bloque de libros se doblan y se encuadernan con un hilo que se pasa a través del grosor del bloque de libros en el margen del canalón, es decir, a cierta distancia del lomo. En los otros dos casos, las hojas se doblan y se encuadernan con un hilo o con grapas metálicas a lo largo del margen de encuadernación.

Fig. 1. Gran Bretaña. El pasaporte. El borde inferior. El cosido lateral con hilo de un bloque de libro hecho con hojas plegadas (el lugar de la costura está marcado con una flecha)


Fig. 2. Letonia. El documento de viaje expedido en 2007:
a — la página extendida (páginas 18-19); b — lo mismo. El borde superior. El cosido con hilo de un bloque de libro hecho de hojas plegadas. La costura del hilo de coser va a 4 mm del borde de la encuadernación


Fig. 3. Kirguistán. El pasaporte expedido en 2007:
a — la página extendida (páginas 16-17); b — lo mismo. El borde superior. El cosido con hilo de un bloque de libro hecho de hojas plegadas. La costura del hilo de coser pasa por el centro del borde de la encuadernación


Fig. 4. Belarús (antigua Bielorrusia). El documento de identidad de refugiado expedido en 2000:
a — el cosido a caballete (encuadernación con grapas metálicas); b — lo mismo. La portada. El fragmento en Zoom. La grapa metálica


VENTANA TRANSPARENTE

Un área transparente no impresa en el sustrato. Se usa como un filtro para visualizar las imágenes latentes codificadas cuando se aplica una fotografía secundaria a la página adyacente. Esta medida protege el documento de seguridad contra sus copias y escaneos ilegales.

Fig. 1. Suecia. El pasaporte expedido en 2011:
a — la página doble (las páginas 2 y 3); b — lo mismo. La página 2. La ventana transparente. El sustrato de polímero. La luz transmitida; c — lo mismo. La página 1. Al voltear la página de datos la ventana transparente (marcada con un marco) se coloca sobre la fotografía secundaria en la página 3; d — lo mismo. Un fragmento en zoom. La ventana transparente. Para capturar la imagen fue colocada una hoja de papel blanco debajo de la ventana transparente. El número en la ventana transparente está grabado por láser en relieve; e — lo mismo. La ventana transparente coincide con la fotografía secundaria en la página 3. Un filtro permite visualizar la información personal invisible


VISADO

El permiso para entrar y/o salir del territorio de un país en forma de etiqueta, inserción, sello o etiqueta pequeña. El visado se coloca en las páginas especiales de un documento de viaje o puede ser usada como un documento separado.

Fig. 1. Polonia:
a — el visado en forma de etiqueta expedida en 2004. El sustrato de papel; b — lo mismo. La luz ultravioleta; c — lo mismo. La luz infrarroja


Fig. 2. Turquía:
a — el visado en forma de etiqueta pequeña. Se aplica en las páginas de un documento de viaje. El sustrato de papel; b — lo mismo. La luz ultravioleta


Fig. 3. Líbano. El visado en forma de sello de tinta en la página de un documento de viaje



Hi! We are ready to help you.

Please, let us know what you are interested in.

Get in touch

Name
company/organization
country
phone number
message
attach file